Dan Gregory

April 14, 2010

Dan Gregory from our own Northeastern School of Technological Entrepreneurship stopped by to talk with us a little bit and share some ideas with us on how journalism can, and is, being integrated into the world of technological entrepreneurship.

This is an idea that has interested me a little bit, though admittedly only a little bit, because it strikes me as something that I could potentially see myself trying if a more conventional route doesn’t work out right away. The idea of starting your own news website, or blog, and expanding it and running with it.

There’s even a website I’ve taken note of recently that I think does a good job of what an aspiring sports journalist could go out and do on his own – San Fran Preps.

It’s a nice little website, with pretty solid coverage, and if you know how tight-knit the community of native San Franciscans (among which I do not count, boring suburban me) is and how school pride relates to their sense of identity, you know there’s definitely a market for this sort of stuff out there.

I’ve often considered the idea of starting something of my own along those lines in my home community – Solano County – because I think there could be a market for it in the small towns that make up Solano, which extends closer to Sacramento, and has more of those small-towny types of places, than, say, Alameda County (Oakland) or Santa Clara County (San Jose) which tend to be dominated by a real major city. If covering high school sports in Massachusetts has taught me anything, it’s that small-towny type places care way, way more about high school sports than other kinds of communities (there are no shortage of tiny towns around Boston, I assure you).

So yeah, it was interesting to see Gregory promote the idea of entrepreneurial journalism, which really only exists online, because it’s something I’ve given thought to before and it’s something I could see myself maybe giving a go at if I find myself sitting around, jobless, with nothing else to do. And people have done it before, all across the country. Especially with high school sports, where access is generally not difficult to obtain (and usually welcomed, even), and where competition for coverage, especially in suburban areas, is not great.

On the other hand, I could see myself totally screwing up my own enterprise, so I’ll stick to leaving it as an idea of last resort for now.

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